Friday, March 31, 2006

Headlines for 31 March 2006

Trends
Google searches for TV chief
Business 2.0 via CNN Money.com
Google Maps Out Its Ad Future
Publish
China plans new intellectual property laws to combat illegal downloads
AFX via Forbes
Google Ready to Challenge the iTunes Music Store
Apple Matters
US government forces .xxx delay
PC World
Dialed In: Do You Watch TV on Your Cell Phone?
PC World via Yahoo! News
YouTube.com cracks down on copyrighted video
Reuters
Digital Divide Closing as Blacks Turn to Internet
The New York Times*
Digital Hollywood Mulls Changing Content Rights
InformationWeek
No decision on Microsoft antitrust fines for 'weeks'
CNET News

Best Practices
Online newspapers should un-bundle content and bundle business
The Editors Weblog

Cool Tools
Copy Structured Data Between Web Sites Through RSS: Ray's Live Clipboard Is Next
Robin Good
FeedDemon 2.0, Nourishment For News Junkies
Information Week

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Wolters Kluwer App Links to Drug Database
Health Data Management
American Airlines Selects Worldspan as Long-Term Content Distributor
PR Newswire
FAST Acquires Kopek AS
BusinessWire
CCH Integrates with Microsoft Dynamics Products
Web CPA
Fast Search & Transfer wins search solution contract with Live Nation
AFX via Forbes

Products, Markets & People
McGraw-Hill Brings World-Renowned Online Medical Resource to the Spanish-Speaking World
PR Newswire
CMP Media Launches DSO World at Embedded Systems Conference Silicon Valley 2006, April 4-6
PR Newswire
SeatGuru.com Launches Site Redesign With New Airline Travel Content and Coverage of 30th Airline
PR Newswire
Former astronaut named president of McGraw-Hill Aerospace & Defense
BtoB Online

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Google Gears Up Capital for Acquisitions: Personal Content, Finance, or Others?

Business Week notes along with other majors Google's readying a stock offering that's expected to yield about USD 2 Billion at it's current prices - about enough to purchase the Facebook.com personal content portal, by perhaps no small coincidence. Facebook is about on par with Google's Orkut personal portal in traffic, but both are trailing News Corporation's Myspace.com personal content portal by a long shot: Myspace comes up number 8 in Alexa's latest Web site rankings. This can only warm Rupert Murdoch's heart, as noted by Forbes, who raised quite a few eyebrows when he bought the upstart portal for USD 580 million last July. With Myspace's surging growth - tripling traffic since last July - this now begins to look like a bargain. So perhaps 2 Billion is not too much to ask for a Facebook, the thinking goes.

But looking at the historical traffic, it's not clear that Facebook adds up to a 2 Billion solution for Google. Although it came on strong in the past few months, Facebook's overall traffic has leveled off, according to Alexa, and still remains below Myspace's level of last July when they were acquired. Facebook may be a good acquisition, but it's doubtful that it's going to command the top line price they're seeking. Google could instead get a more reasonable price for Facebook and spread investments into other lucrative areas. Certainly their financial portal is a good start on offering more information to adults that can command valuable advertising, so expanding relationships with vendors such as Reuters in finance and other sectors may yield a broader demographic for advertisers keen for more valuable outlets for ad inventory. It's important to keep apace with the younger generations growing up on the Web, but the greatest gains in margins may be in servicing graying but affluent surfers effectively. We'll see where this goes but I am betting on some surprises in how Google puts these new funds to work.

Headlines for 30 March 2006

Trends
Google's Surprising Stock Sale
BusinessWeek
Tony Ridder Drops Bid to Buy 3 Papers
Editor & Publisher
Extra! Are Tribune's Parts Extra?
WSJ Online*
Murdoch Will Earn A Payday From MySpace
Forbes
Indonesia to create team to fight intellectual property violations
AFX via Forbes
Microsoft, Google fight Web bill
Seattle PI.com
Technology's Advances Bring Evolution in Media, Journalism
U.S. Department of State
Video Advertising Marketplace Bets On User Contributions: Revver
Robin Good
Justice Department Subpoenas Reach Far Beyond Google
Information Week
For Sale: Your Life on the Internet
News Factor Network
Amazon Changes Affiliate Fees, Raises Ire
eCommerce Guide
It's my Internet--I can do what I want
CNET News

Best Practices
SEO versus Marketing: The Fine Art of Copywriting
Internet Search Engine Database

Cool Tools
Six Apart Launches TypePad Widgets
Publish
More Widgets from Automattic
The Blog Herald

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

TheLadders.com Signs Exclusive Partnership With BusinessWeek Online
PR Newswire via Forbes

Products, Markets & People
REEDFAX Patent File Histories Now Accessible from Lexis.com Patent Search Results
TMCNet
ALM's Law.com Names New Legal Blog Watch Editors, Adds Three Leading Legal Commentators
BusinessWire

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

OneSource's Account Intelligence Pumps Leads and Data Direct to Salesforce.com Clients

InfoUSA's OneSource Information Services has announced the addition of its Account Intelligence service to Salesforce.com's AppExchange add-on software and content service store. The service pumps cleansed contact data and relevant news, research and data on companies right into a user's SF.com service, with administrative controls similar to OneSource's earlier offerings via this service. In playing with the AppExchange kit it's interesting to see how self-service sales for business content services have been extended to provide a sophisticated sales presence online. In addition to product information sheets and user reviews OneSource provides a slide show with built-in audio narrative based on Macromedia's Breeze application narrated by a sales executive. It's a reminder that people buy business content at the "point of pain" and that both services and marketing need to follow the users into the contexts that they value most to have those pain points addressed. Being able to get content into user workflows on an as-needed basis took a huge step forward when Salesforce.com introduced AppExchange: now it's time for more business content providers to examine how both services and marketing can move to where users have the need and to sell them in context on the value of their services.

Headlines for 29 March 2006

Trends
Time Inc. Makes New Bid To Be Big Web Player
WSJ Online*
Yahoo Japan to take stake in online bank
Reuters
New broadband bill draws fire
CNET News
Facebook's on the Block
BusinessWeek
M&A Market: What's Left?
paidContent.org
How Digg.com is democratizing the news
Business 2.0 via CNN Money.com
Local journalism imperiled
USA Today
Skype Faces $4.1 Billion Lawsuit Over Racketeering Charges

TMCNet
Postgenomic - Life Science Community Aggregator and Review Engine
Ed Tech Post
Multimedia, Data-Rich Mobile Phones Rapidly Taking Market Share in Asia
BusinessWire
ValueClick integrates ad networks
BtoB Online
Americans eager to share secrets with blogger
USA Today via Argus Leader
3 Out of 4 Visitors to the Met Never Make it to the Front Door
The New York Times*
Meet the Jefferson of 'Web 2.0'
The Register

Cool Tools
Knova Awarded Patent on Context-Based Search and Knowledge Management Technology
AGIP News

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Verizon SuperPages.com joins Google AdWords
CNET via ZDNet
Pulse Mobile Announces Partnership With Oasys Mobile for Next-Generation of User Generated Content
PrimeZone via Yahoo! Finance
Reed Life Sciences Expands Global INTERPHEX to Mexico; to Co-Locate with PMMI's EXPO PACK Event
BusinessWire
AppOne Partners with Wolters Kluwer Financial
Auto Remarketing

Products, Markets & People
ALM's National Law Journal Re-Launches Web Site with Added Content, New Navigation and Search Tools
BusinessWire
Alacra Store Unveils New Keyword Search for over 200 Million Premium Business Information Reports
BusinessWire
Total Bankruptcy Makes Bankruptcy Information Available for Free Reprint
PR Web
infoUSA's OneSource and Salesforce.Com Deliver Integrated Account Intelligence Solution
BusinessWire
Scopus Integrated Directly into Editors' and Reviewers' Workflow
CCNews
Recent changes to Westlaw
The Valpo Law Blawg

Supercharging Yellow Pages: Verizon SuperPages Links Advertisers to Google Search Results Ads Today - Wireless Next?

In the ever-evolving battle for the pockets of local business advertisers the yellow pages industry has been fighting a tough battle to retain the advertising dollars of grass-roots patrons. More and more of these businesses are discovering that the first stop for people looking for local services increasingly draws them to major search engine portals. Increasingly this means not even bothering with the "local pages" offered up by one of these portals but just typing in what you think you need into the main search box of a portal and trusting the search engine to do the rest. This works increasingly well on search engines like Google, which have awareness of one's locality through examining your network connection and can use that data to put search results - and ads - in a more local context. So small wonder, then, that telecoms giant Verizon has announced that its SuperPages online yellow pages service has joined Google's AdWords reseller network to channel its advertisers into the contextual ads that appear on Google's search results and via other channels. This expands the Verizon relationship with Google in which they were providing profiles of their advertisers to Google.

Yet one wonders whether this may not be a harbinger of broader business relationships yet to come for telecoms providers and Google. This of course helps Verizon to extend the reach of its marketing power for local advertisers into existing Google channels and provides Google indirectly with a huge sales force that engages small businesses on the level that most are used to dealing with to manage their tiny ad budgets. But given Google's push into wireless markets this may also be the start of a relationship that could result in a very convenient way for pumping ads into the ad-supported wireless services that Google is preparing to launch. I think of this especially in light of the recent patent filings by Google focused on providing sponsorship of browser windows and managing ads via wireless services. What better way to inject new life into yellow pages ads than to have an ad appear on your wireless device when you're closest to that local merchant? We have been telling people for some time to prepare for the seismic changes that are likely to unfold as Google begins to enable wireless services; the Verizon announcement is but one more reminder that this future is not so far off.

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Headlines for 28 March 2006

Trends
Patents could show Google's wireless intent
CNET via ZDNet
FEC Won't Regulate Most Activity On Web Under Campaign Law
WSJ Online*
The New Wisdom of the Web
Newsweek
Syndicate this! Linking old media to new
USC Annenberg OJR
It's a small world now: big media stocks still lifeless
Variety
Dow Jones: Driving Into The Future, Looking In The Rear View Mirror
Media Stock Blog
Is The New York Times Trying to Commit Slo-Mo Suicide?
Ad Age
Google Joins the Lobbying Herd
The New York Times*
Can the Sony Reader Push eBooks into the Mainstream?
EContent Magazine
Role of Distributors Like Yahoo and Google Threatened?
paidContent.org
Yahoo co-founder Yang defends co's cooperation with Chinese censors
AFX via Forbes
Blogs: Look at me, I'm King Content
Telegraph
Researcher: DRM Has Deep Flaws
PC World
Enterprise Search: IT Faces the Google Phenomenon
Enterprise Systems Journal
Google, Barnes and Noble Test New Ads
Publish
Charging $183,000 For Online Legal Research?
Law.com Blog Network

Best Practices
Digital Content And Public Citizen Access: Digital Freedoms - A Manifesto From The Roots
Robin Good
How to Harness the Marketing Power of Blogs
Entrepreneur
How Yellow Pages Is Disconnected From Real Small Business Customers
Merchant Circle

Cool Tools
SRC Introduces Application to Unleash the Actionable Intelligence in Business Content
PR Newswire via Sys-Con
Microsoft mixes software for business 'mashups'
CNET News

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Reprints Desk Selects RapidRights(TM) from Cadmus for Digital Rights Management of Article Reprints
PR Newswire
Convera and Factiva enter indexing deal
VNUNet

Products, Markets & People
Endeca Expands Search and Information Access Market Solutions On New Information Access Platform
BusinessWire
Elsevier Launches Inteleos Drug Tracking and Analysis Tool
Web Wire

Monday, March 27, 2006

A Movable Feast: New Social Portals as The New Bar-Hopping

The announcement of an upgraded version of the popular Buzznet social publishing portal happens to coincide with the conclusion of spring break activities for many college students, so it's not surprising that the portal features photos, comments and stories from this annual pilgrimage of party spirits. It also helps to underscore the increasing similarity of many of these services: there are only so many ways that you can post pictures, comments and other personal content, just as there are only so many ways that you can go into a bar and get drunk. From the users' standpoint, that's probably not a problem. Kids love to hop from one hot spot to another, so having a variety of social content services at their disposal is probably not too different from having a strip of bars along the beach in Fort Lauderdale to support their real-world social endeavors. Wherever the scene gathers at the moment, there they go, from one bookmark to the next.

But this vagabond spirit also highlights the importance of developing communities that are likely to have a little higher quality clientele and more of a sense of true community rather than casual relationships if advertisers are to make the most of social content services. There's plenty of money to be made in social content "gin mills," but it's in general a far better idea to be thinking about your audiences ahead of time and setting up features and reefs of high-quality content that are likely to attract a specific type of clientele for your advertisers. This may sound a little too much like - gasp! - publishing for some people's tastes, but as the breadth of social content services grows ever wider it will become far more important to think out loud ahead of time as to what you want your clientele to be when the party's over.

News Analysis - Instant Syndication: Mochila Twists a Familiar Model to Support The New Aggregation

A mochila is a lightweight backpack, the type that students everywhere stuff with books, iPods and other useful content. The new Mochila content syndication service has a similar concept: let publishers pick up just what fits their needs from other publishers and then run with it wherever they need to take it. Mochila's by-the-item syndication allows licensees to pay for content outright or to take it for free if they're willing to use Mochila-provided ads. It's an idea whose time may be just right given the explosion of content destinations that attract today's users. Could Mochila be the tool that creates an explosion in ad hoc online syndication?

Click here to read the full News Analysis

Factiva Moves to Affiliates to Power Reputation Management Drivers

Reputation management and media intelligence services have been hot on the lips of many content providers as of late, but selling content services into a specialized community such as public relations professionals can get a little sticky for a content companies. There are ways of doing business in the trade and consultancies that have been in the space for decades that are going to be far ahead of publishers in industry knowledge and networking. So its no great surprise that Factiva has announced a new affiliate network program to support its marketing efforts to support its line of services supporting public relations consultancies and agencies. This logical move, though, points up one of the continuing challenges faced by aggregators as they identify more and more specific market niches into which they can deploy content services: how to sell a content solution for business problems when the solutions providers in that space have their own way of doing business. Working with I.T.-oriented companies as partners to provide premium content services in enterprise and online portals is one thing: working with business solutions providers that may touch upon content technologies only lightly in their main line of consultancy is quite another.

Yet this is the future for many content service providers identifying specific niches for complex services that can drive up revenues and margins. Working with affiliate networks can be difficult and can eat into margins, but where a content provider's brand is not well established in a specific market segment affiliates make great sense for supporting an initial penetration into narrow but lucrative niches. It makes sense especially for a company such as Factiva, which has a lot of irons in the fire and cannot afford to hire and train over-specialized sales professionals to service a specific niche with relatively limited market potential. As more and more business content providers define more niche-oriented opportunities on the high end of their markets the search for effective sales affiliations will become more important -and will inevitably push business content providers more into the roles of the companies with which they affiliate in order to maximize their revenues.

Sales and marketing channel conflicts are likely to erupt in these affiliate programs as content companies try to build more home-grown penetration, but if content providers are interested in becoming business solutions providers that can dominate given solutions niche they will have to juggle affiliates and their own sales and implementation capabilities quickly and carefully to extend their relationships as broadly as possible. Over time this may mean that many business aggregators will come to resemble management consultancies more than content vendors - and that may not be a bad thing. It may also indicate the types of companies to which many high-end business content solutions providers may market their exit strategies in the years ahead. But in the meantime, there's lots of money to be made via affiliates to enhance business content's value in specific market sectors.

Headlines for 27 March 2006

Trends
Newspaper Content Part of Mochila's New 'Media Marketplace'
Editor & Publisher
Players Big and Small Are Sifting Through Pieces of Knight
Ridder

The New York Times*
Chicagotribune.com: A decade later, online toast to indispensability
The Seattle Times
Auto Journalism's New Speed
BusinessWeek
China calls for more time, recognition in fight against piracy
AFX via Forbes
Yahoo Moves to Dampen YPN Publisher Furor
Publish
Pomeroy scrutinized after CFO named in Proquest suit
ProQuest
Google to Join S&P 500 After Quadrupling Since IPO
Bloomberg
'Rocketboom': So what's all the fuss about?
Chicago Tribune
French DRM ruling will spark protracted legal battles
VNUNet
Denmark set to follow French DRM decision?
Macworld
Needing Cash, Bertelsmann May Sell Music Assets
WSJ Online*

Best Practices

First Online Payment System To Be Open-Source And Bank-Independent Now In Beta: Ripple

Robin Good
Buzznet Inc. Launches Buzznet 2.0 Community Platform to Create, Share and Distribute Multimedia
Buzznet

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Yahoo Japan to buy Toshiba's online news search unit for 1.3 bln yen
AFX via Forbes
Jambo and Interchange Corporation Partner to Provide Local.com Advertisers with Pay-Per-Call Capabilities
Jambo
blinkx Signs Content Agreement With Revver
PR Newswire

Products, Markets & People
Dow Jones Online GM Nathan Richardson Leaves
paidContent.org
LexisNexis Adds WorldCompliance Content for Due Diligence on Politically Exposed Persons
BusinessWire
Macrovision Advances Information Commerce with Next Generation eRights Suite
CRM Today
Cognos Announces New Cognos Go! Search Service
PR Newswire
InfoSpace Introduces New Local Search Site with Focus on High Relevancy and Personalization
BusinessWire
Financial Media Group, Inc. Announces Launch of Financial Filings, Corp. a Wholly Owned Subsidiary
PR Newswire
Knova Awarded Patent on Context-Based Search and Knowledge Management Technology
Marketwire

Headline Summary for Week of 20 March 2006

Want to catch up on last week's headlines? Try our weekly categorized summary with embedded commentary on the latest trends.

Click here to view last week's headlines in review

Friday, March 24, 2006

The Vista Gap: DRM Assumptions Dealt a Powerful Blow in Microsoft Setback

The AP notes along with many others the technology winners and losers in the delayed launch of Microsoft's new Windows Vista operating system, but the potential impact to content producers goes largely uncovered so far. Vista was to have been the lock-down platform for digital rights management that would solve the distribution issues of many media and publishing companies. Now delayed into 2007, 2006 becomes a year in which there will be far greater uncertainty amongst content producers about which path to take in protecting intellectual property rights. This opens up a huge window of opportunity for content producers to rethink their DRM strategies and to reconsider how open DRM standards or less platform-dependent proprietary systems may be able to help them make progress in their plans to protect intellectual property via rights management. It may also give enterprise-oriented companies a new opportunity to think about how the rapid progression of enterprise DRM to support compliance and legal retention requirements may need to be considered anew as factors in packaging content.

While it's far from clear that content producers will start scrambling for these alternatives any time soon, the consumer side of the business doubtless sees holiday sales looming and will want to consider some plan "B"s to approach managing IP this year. Whatever their choices, the all-purpose Microsoft-centric PC as a repository for professionally produced content just took a huge step backwards. We're not likely to see Linux desktops sprouting up like weeds any time soon, but content producers may look back at this point in time and see that this was the beginning of a time when they began to consider more seriously how they could succeed independent of a Microsoft-dictated future for their content rights management.

Headlines for 24 March 2006

Trends
Novell delights in postponed release of Windows Vista
AP via Seattle PI.com
In a War of Words, Famed Encyclopedia Defends Its Turf
WSJ Online*
Broadband giants say Net neutrality fears misguided
CNET News
Net Stocks Restart Financial Fling
TheStreet.com
Young people turn to the Web for news
USA Today
Why the Media Sector Is Far from Dead
Morningstar
Yahoo to Discontinue Yahoo Plus Premium Bundle
PC World
Analyst: Yahoo Non-Search Advertising Strength, Positive; Yahoo Media Group, Negative
paidContent.org
A New (Mobile) World Is Coming
Information Today
Done Deal for 101communications?
FOLIO: Magazine
Coming soon: Download-to-own films
CNN.com
Across the Web/Print Divide
Editor & Publisher
VCs Wary of a New Web Idea That Rings Old
The New York Times*
US government backs Apple against France
PC Advisor
"Blog Thefts" Illustrate Gray Areas In Content Rights
Consumer Affairs

Best Practices
Querying The Next Generation
OMMA

Cool Tools
Embedded Micro Browsers Offer Enhanced Navigation Within Web Pages
Robin Good

Deals, Partnerships & Sales


MindLeaders Partners with OCLC NetLibrary to Enhance Reference Library

BusinessWire via TMCNet

Products, Markets & People
ProQuest Increases Library Options; Expands Digitization; Announces Partnership
EContent Magazine
InfoUSA to compile U.K. small-business database
BtoB Online
U.S. Editor at Economist Is Appointed Editor in Chief
The New York Times*

Wednesday, March 22, 2006

French Twist to DRM Puts Apple on Defensive

BBC News reports on a bill now passed by the lower house of France's legislature that would require content providers to offer non-proprietary DRM software on devices such as Apple's iPod. The bill is headed to France's Senate, but in the meantime according to the BBC Apple is firing back decrying "a state-sponsored culture of piracy." This of course ignores evolving open DRM standards promoted by organizations such as the Open Mobile Alliance, which would encourage the use of copyrighted content with DRM controls that don't lock a user into a specific platform. While the fate of this bill is still up for grabs it's clear that European and Asian markets are going to be looking for every advantage that they can find in re-establishing their hold on rapidly emerging mobile content markets in which much of today's entertainment is going to be consumed in the years ahead. To do this they must be able both to protect intellectual property rights and have access to platforms that allow them to have a firmer say over how content is licensed and priced.

Apple's long-standing approach to keeping its sliver of market share has been to develop really nicely designed products to soften the ultimately unappealing prospect of being locked into a proprietary platform. That's served them reasonably well up to this point but with a burgeoning marketplace for open standard platforms and greater consumer demand to have content licensing separated from platforms it's a battle that's not likely to favor their content lock-down scheme in the long run. But then again we're all dead in the long run, as they say, so Apple and other dominant media-oriented companies are going to continue to resist the call for open DRM standards as long as possible.

In the meantime content suppliers that are glad to work with open DRM standards are likely to increase over the next few years, creating new forms of competition based both on the inherent quality and marketability of DRM-enabled content and its ability to go where users would like it to go. France's rebel role in this debate is not likely to shake world markets any time soon but it will begin to accelerate the discussion amongst content providers towards a consideration of how DRM can be used to effect not only short-term profits but a long-term independence from the designs of technology providers that may not have content producers' profitability foremost in their minds.

Headlines for 22 March 2006

Trends
Apple attacks plan to open iTunes
BBC News
Creative Commons license upheld by court
CNET News
Google Struggles to Find Its Edge
Publish
Google Finance, with Kinks
BusinessWeek
Google Evolves Into All-Purpose Web Site
AP via Yahoo! News
McClatchy: 12 'Orphans' Likely to Go to Different Parents
AP via Editor & Publisher
'Paperback Originals''Are a Growing Niche for Literary Novels
The New York Times*
Audio Interview: Dave Morgan, CEO, Tacoda
paidContent.org
The broadband war of 2006
Fortune via CNN
Time Settles Renewal Probe
TheStreet.com
Search companies dealt reality check in eMarketer report
BtoB Online
Gawker opens postmodern newsroom
The Blog Herald
Making my media portals: To collect, espouse, share ... to 'Plum'
MarketWatch*
As Market Shifts, Newspapers Try to Lure New, Young Readers
WSJ Online*

Best Practices
What the Heck is Social Search?
iMedia Connection

Cool Tools
Podzinger: Finding and Recognizing Content in Podcasts
PC Magazine
SafeNet Launches DRM Fusion Toolkit
IT Backbones

Products, Markets & People
New and Forthcoming Titles from LexisNexis
Law Librarian Blog

Tuesday, March 21, 2006

Google Finance Beta Debuts: Clean, Comprehensive and Different

Reuters reports along with the world on the debut of Google Finance, the long-awaited portal offering that offers a clean and sophisticated look at financial content. Rafat Ali on paidContent.org notes that the portal was developed with support from Reuters, Revere Data, Dun & Bradstreet, Hoover's and Morningstar, but these top-notch sources are just the beginning of the story. The interface is in some ways quite familiar - only so many ways to show stock quotes and charts - but the interactive charting function is far more sophisticated than that offered by Yahoo! Finance. Glide your cursor over the points on the curve and you get automatic readouts of the market data at that point in time. The posting time of headlines displayed for a given stock are tied in to the charting function, so you can see easily how major news events related to stock movement. As with Google Maps, you can grab the chart with your cursor and drag it either direction in time - and as you do, the headlines move along with it to indicate the news for the displayed period. The rest of the page includes key company facts, a company summary, key management, top line company financials with links to details, data on related companies with links to sector data, blog posts gleaned from Google's own weblog search and links to other sources - including Google Finance's own comparison charts and research reports repository.

All of this on ONE PAGE. Yahoo! Finance offers additional details such as
SEC filings, holdings and insider transactions data that's likely to be of interest to more sophisticated investors, the Google offering provides a remarkable range of content in one spot accompanied by functionality that readily distinguishes it from the Yahoo! offering. This is a tool for people who want to understand the markets as easily as possible, with a great deal of thought put in to what an individual investor needs to know to monitor a company and make effective decisions. It can be argued that other offerings will offer more, but it's already a good enough offering that Google's pre-eminent position as a search engine destination can easily draw off traffic that would have been bound for other portals as a matter of course. With that traffic in hand this "Beta" version of Google Finance can be easily refined to bolster up its responsiveness to its audience. We've been aware of this for some time and aware of the players involved, but it's impressive nevertheless to see such a powerful and clean initial offering. There's little doubt that Google Finance will be off to a strong start - if they can keep the usual Google technical glitches at bay.

Headlines for 21 March 2006

Trends
Google launches financial news, data, blog site
Reuters
Google Finance Launch: The Reuters Deal
paidContent.org
Reuters boss takes pay cut despite revenues boost
The Times Online
McGraw-Hill CEO 2005 Bonus $1.83 Million Vs $1.76 Million
Dow Jones via SmartMoney.com
Google News dumps I-Newswire partner after prank item appears
CNET News
Advertising: New Rules of Engagement
The New York Times*
Gates admits IE failings, looks to an AJAX future
CNET via ZDNet UK

Best Practices
Getting Over the 'Walled-Garden' Approach to News Web Sites
Editor & Publisher

Cool Tools
SafeNet Launches DRM Fusion Toolkit; Solution Supports New OMA DRM V2.0 Standard
BusinessWire
New Website Enables Internet Users to Create a Website in One Hour
PR Newswire
NewsGator is coming to Windows Mobile
MS Mobiles

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Healthline Rolls Out Strategic Health Content Partnerships
MarketWire
Elsevier MDL and NIH Link PubChem Database and DiscoveryGate(R) Information Platform
BusinessWire
CBS and Verizon Reach Comprehensive Retransmission Consent Agreement
PR Newswire
Engel Publishing Chooses Coveo to Power Personalized e-Content
CNW Group via Yahoo! Finance
DoubleClick agrees to buy Falk eSolutions
BtoB Online

Products, Markets & People
Factiva Introduces the Factiva Insight(TM) Affiliate Network
PR Newswire
SpecificMEDIA Launches Contextual Targeting for Online Advertisers
BusinessWire
BestBlogsMedia LLC Launches Innovative New Community Blogging Network
PR Newswire

Monday, March 20, 2006

News Analysis - Monetizing Context: iCopyright Brings Contextual Ads to User Content Redistribution

Content relicensing services provide publishers with steady if somewhat unglamorous revenues from individuals and institutions willing to pay a premium for the rights to redistribute copyrighted content. But what about the untold millions of individuals who forward content via emails to people who they know - with nary a bit of revenues going to publishers? iCopyright has come up with a simple solution to this long-standing dilemma: make it easy for users to do this using a version of the content that has contextual ads embedded. It's remarkable that making money out of content passed from user to user is still such a new art for most publishers, but with iCopyright's new program it's an art that may become rather familiar to them.

Click here to read the full News Analysis

Headlines for 20 March 2006

Trends
Google claims victory over DoJ
PC Pro
Enterprise Search: In Google's Shadow
ComputerWorld
Rupert Murdoch: 'Newspapers will change, not die'
The Independent
Pruitt 'Peppered with Angry E-mails' From 12 KR Papers
Editor & Publisher
More Than 700 Newspapers Launch $50 Million Trade Campaign to Create Historic Media Roadblock
PR Newswire
Newspapers: From Print to Pixels
BusinessWeek
Increasingly, the news 'scoop' is found online
USA Today
Time Hires Another Blogger; Ana Marie Cox Sells Out Again
The Media Mob
FM Publishing: Going Up Against Google?
Forbes
Audio Interview: Technorati CEO Dave Sifry
paidContent.org
Amazon and Fidelity Link Up in Financial Services
Publish
New York Times Credit Rating Under Watch
AP via Yahoo! News
Canada Gives Safe Harbor to Music Pirates
Blogcritics.org
Microsoft Takes on Craigslist in the Battle for Classified Ads
The New York Times*

Best Practices
The Power Of Open Participatory Media And Why Mass Media
Must Be Abandoned

Robin Good

Cool Tools
PageFlakes: What portals should be

Corante
Making smarter readers: Lessons in Trilliscience

USC Annenberg OJR

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Knovel partners with Singapore science publisher

Mass High Tech
Convera Adds BrightPlanet to its Open Excalibur(TM) Partner Program

BusinessWire
VeriSign Extends Leadership in Mobile Content Infrastructure With Acquisition of m-Qube

PR Newswire via Sys-Con Media

Products, Markets & People
Intellext Announces Integration With Microsoft(R) SharePoint(R) Technologies
PR Newswire
CCH CORSEARCH Becomes CT Corsearch, a CT Member Company and a Wolters Kluwer Business
PR Newswire via Yahoo! Finance

AP Settles in to Dot-Com Digs and a Future Spanning Old and New Visions of News

A recent visit to the Associated Press headquarters in New York City brought me not to tony Rockefeller Center but to the more utilitarian west side of Manhattan, where AP has carved out a new home in space formerly occupied by the DoubleClick online ad network. While many media companies have taken up residence on the west side in recent years to cut costs and gain more open office space, there is something particularly symbolic about a news organization with more than 150 years of history settling down in a facility that is firmly set in the twenty-first century's vision of content creation. The lobby display cases show wonderful memorabilia such as cameras, typewriters and style manuals from the archives of AP but the news floors are strictly today's business environment, with multi-screen desktops spewing out text, video and audio to AP's editorial staff.

There are deep-rooted traditions in the news business that have kept many news organizations from reinventing themselves effectively in today's marketplace, but the AP is moving rapidly to set its own pace as a leader in news content distribution and creation. With venerable competitors like Reuters trying their own impressive modern approaches to content development and distribution and the Wall Street Journal signing on to distribute select features content via Yahoo! Finance there's ample reason for AP to be aggressive in its thinking. In a news market that sees more branded content showing up in more content channels than ever before it's important for news organizations to bring their brands' value closer to readers who are increasingly agnostic in their approach to finding content. With its participation in experiments such as Newsvine AP is doing just that, even as it defines new ways to provide value to its members news organizations engaged in similar reader outreach efforts. Its facility is new and its marketing increasingly progressive, but the best of AP's traditions are not likely to be forgotten as it carves a path to provide the most value that it can to a global news marketplace.

Sunday, March 19, 2006

Parlano Paves the Way for Federated Group Collaboration Content Channels

Go on to most any trading floor in the securities industry and you'll find not only the buzz of people chatting about the latest market trends and research but as well the tapping of keys as those same people participate in online discussions with their colleagues about many of those same topics. One of the growing stars of such groupware in these financial circles is Parlano, whose MindAlign software is used in many of the world's major investment banks to help their staffs communicate with one another. MindAlign is a robust platform that allows users to communicate on specific topics across specific groups as well as in point-to-point conversations - good enough to allow some investment banks to bypass email altogether in their disaster recovery planning in favor of Parlano's ability to keep all key parties in the loop instantaneously in well-organized communications channels.

In a recent run-through of Parlano's capabilities it became clear that major institutional investors are also beginning to take interest in group messaging products, even as Parlano begins pushing into non-financial markets and develops interfaces with public and vendor-based instant messaging networks. The inevitable movement in group messaging is to develop connectivity between the sell side and the buy side that moves beyond hit-and-miss emails and vendor message networks to persistent group-centered networks focused on specific topics that can distribute content to network participants as they keep market-driven conversations alive. Instead of the ubiquitous "inbox" as the destination of choice for market research group messaging channels will become the new common denominator for communicating transaction-worthy content.

Where are content vendors in this new mix? Not much of anywhere, so far. Financial research vendors are still very concentrated on traditional editorial products, finished pieces that travel through email and Web site-based distribution channels. But as group messaging products emerge as channels that connect market participants as a primary means of communications it will become increasingly important for content vendors to have effective strategies for participating in those channels. This will mean research vendors being able not only to transmit research and analysis in finished pieces but as well to participate as peers providing valuable conversation-level input to these networks. Content of all kinds needs to move with the people moving their peers, and increasingly content providers need to act as peers within those networks themselves. Parlano gives a broad hint of the power of this concept when it can live independent of content vendor networks via federations of market participants. Here's to hoping that financial content vendors begin to pick up on the hint.

Headline Summary for the Week of 13 March 2006

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Friday, March 17, 2006

Penton's American Machinist Tools Up Online Community

At the recent ABM Digital Media Day Michael Azzara, Vice President of Internet business for CMP Media noted that "“Audiences have begun to become the brands," an observation that would seem to compel magazine publishers to seek more ways to have those brands under their own marques. Penton Media just announced a foray into capturing user-driven branding by incoroprating the popular PracticalMachinist.com online bulletin board service into its Amercian Machinist Web site offering. Like user-driven offerings such as Craigslist PracticalMachinist is notable for its homeliness: it's basically an off-the-shelf online forum product. But at half a million unique visits the dialogs initiated by this service are forming the powerful core of an online community that manages its own content and market conversations with some efficiently.

This is a good example of how it does not take the slickest technology or presentation to build up user-generated media; rather, it becomes a matter of having a true conversation of key people within a community to drive up authentice content that traditional editorial content can complement and reference. The dot-com classic "The Cluetrain Manifesto" reminds us that markets are conversations: in real life many key business conversations take place in coffee shops and other informal settings as much as they do in board rooms and high-profile events. Don't let the simplicity of many user-generated media facilities fool you, if the crowds and the conversations are right the dollars will follow more quickly than you may imagine.

Headlines for 17 March 2006

Trends
Big media and the internet: Net dreams
The Economist
ABM Digital Day: "Disruption is opportunity"
FOLIO: Magazine
Yahoo! Finance Braces For Google
Forbes
Google's Schmidt Clears The Air
PC Magazine
Google 10K: New Emphasis On Mobile Platforms, Monetizing
Content

paidContent.org
Microsoft's $500 Million Message: People Are The Business
InformationWeek
Bill Gates Mocks $100 Laptop
Red Herring
Newspaper Guy Bets Big
BusinessWeek
NYTimes uncorks a vintage
Blog Herald

Best Practices
Go to the Web, young journalist!
USC Annenberg OJR
Why we should think twice about 'net neutrality'
FT.com

Cool Tools
OpenWave Content Delivery Suite helps expand mobile data services.
ThomasNet
Got Firefox? Library Link to Google Book Search Now Available
Library Journal

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Penton Media's American Machinist Partners with PracticalMachinist.com Interactive Community Content
TMCNet
LexisNexis(R) Martindale-Hubbell(R) to Provide Online Client Development Products for Meyer Darragh
BusinessWire
Scripps buys uSwitch for $366 million
MarketWatch*

Products, Markets & People
Alacra Launches Alacra Compliance to Streamline and Document Account Vetting Process
BusinessWire
DigitalContainers Inc. Gains New Digital Distribution
Patent 'Delivering Electronic Content'

PR Web
AED Law Center Offers Full Content and Expert Commentary onDefibrillator U.S. Laws & Risk Issues
BusinessWire

Wednesday, March 15, 2006

Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Picking and Choosing Winners in the McClatchy-Knight Ridder Deal

The newspaper industry is reacting to the fallout of the McClatchy deal to purchase Knight Ridder, specifically the intent of McClatchy to spin off as soon as possible at least 12 of the 32 Knight Ridder papers (LA Times), notably those in markets that don't match the dynamics that McClatchy seeks for long-term profits and growth. McClatchy tends to focus on small- and mid-market papers in growing markets, so it's not surprising that it's candidates for resale include papers in problematic major markets - including Tony Ridder's beloved flagship San Jose Mercury News. The New York Times captures the glee of Bruce Sherman, a major newspaper investor via Private Capital Management, who sees the deal as a plus in a fairly pessimistic market that he still sees as a solid investment. While there is a lot of drama and angst in this deal, when the dust settles it's likely that McClatchy will have done their very best to carve out a set of properties that are both profitable and demonstrating good growth dynamics in markets where there are fewer pressures than those faced by papers in major markets, where online substitutes for global and local news and advertising services are larger threats.

In spite of the push towards more local online content many small and mid-size markets are still decent niches for newspapers, small enough that it's difficult for full-service competitors to be funded and draw allegiance from local retail advertisers but large enough to leverage profits via outlets with little strong competition. This formula is starting to change as online substitutes get more sophisticated and classified ads via Craigslist and other online services draw upon many of those same markets. But most all of these lack the combination of both strong local editorial resources and a sophisticated advertising and marketing infrastructure for local advertisers to succeed. User-generated media will help to tip these scales somewhat (one can imagine a player like Gather learning how to attack local markets with a higher grade of editorial content than most blog plays and both their own ads and Craigslist) but for the time being McClatchy is off to a promising if noisy start to as good a strategy as any one could come up with to manage the most promising and profitable Knight Ridder properties. For those left out in the cold from this deal our true sympathies, but sentiment will not take the place of good business sense oftentimes lacking in forging a solid future for news organizations in major markets.

Headlines for 14 March 2006

Trends
Dow Jones to Pay $202 Million To Settle Dispute
WSJ Online*
The Times to End Daily Stock Listings in April and Expand Data on Web Site
The New York Times*
Internet means end for media barons, says Murdoch
The Guardian
Was Death of Newspapers Greatly Exaggerated, or Is Verdict Still Out?
The New York Times*
Ridder Surprised, Unhappy Over McClatchy Flipping 12 Papers
Editor & Publisher
The Future in Black and White
Opinion Journal
Dow Jones' reorganization gets mixed reviews
BtoB Online
Guarding Google's Data Banks
BusinessWeek
The New Nexis
Web Search Guide
AOL's Blog King
Newsweek via MSNBC
Weblogs Inc to become Netscape ?
Jack of All Blogs
Liberte, egalite, fraternite--and a more open iTunes?
Blogma
Google Maps goes to Mars
PC Pro
25 Things I Hate About Google
Search Engine Watch
Gartner: Google enterprise search has its limits
ZDNet UK
WSJ.com launches redesign of home page
BtoB Online
Craigslist, Wikipedia founders chat at SXSW
CNET News
Now the little guy is the true pit bull of journalism
The Guardian

Best Practices
The Myth Of Branded Content
Robin Good
When you need to localize and categorize
CMS Watch
Google's Big Daddy Seeking Content
SEO Done Right

Cool Tools
Prospero Blogging Application Gains Traction With Major Online Publications
PR Newswire via Yahoo! Finance
Researchers develop new digital rights technology
Linux World Australia

Deals, Partnerships & Sales

Newsweek Launches NewsGator and FeedBurner Services
PR Newswire via Yahoo! Finance
Groxis and EBSCO Publishing Partner to Provide Visual Search Technology
PR Newswire via Yahoo! FInance
Metaweb Technologies, Inc. Receives $15 Million of Financing
PR Newswire

Products, Markets & People
Elsevier Announces the Departure of Fiona Foley
Managing Information
Experian Launches New Credit Scoring System, VantageScore(SM)
PR Newswire
Wolters Kluwer Health Introduces Price Rx(TM) Drug Price and Reference Tool for Healthcare Professionals
BusinessWire via TMCNet
FIND/SVP Changes Name to Guideline
PR Newswire
Gather.com Launches National Scholastic Journalism Contest
PR Newswire